What can you do with a degree in Computer Science?

We are very proud of the fact that nine out of every ten of our students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating. Of those who do go into employment straight from their degree, 90 per cent of them take up employment in a professional or managerial position.

Our collaboration with industry and the industrial placements we offer help us to keep abreast of developments in such as dynamic and fast-moving industry sector. Many students who choose to take an industrial placement often find themselves ahead of the race for jobs at graduation - or even with a job offer before they finish their degree.

So, which industries do they choose to enter when they leave York?

Career options

As a graduate of Computer Science from York, you will develop a range of skills that are attractive to a wide range of employers. Information technology is a rapidly expanding field, and this has created demand for computer scientists and software engineers across a broad section of employers. Many of our graduates are employed by software and electronics industries, but the continuing expansion of the use of computers in commercial and financial operations means that you will be able to find employment in other industries - and here your sharpened numeracy and analytical skills will have prepared you well.

Here's some idea of which industry sectors our graduates choose to work in:

Pie chart of industry sectors of Computer Science graduate employment

These figures are calculated from York's Careers service.

Graduate profiles

You can find more information about the types of jobs our graduates go into, and some profiles of recent graduates on the Careers website.

Here's a few recent examples of students gaining employment on graduation:

Phil, MEng Computer Science with Embedded Systems Engineering with a year in industry 2013, McLaren F1 Team

Matthew, MEng Computer Science with Embedded Systems Engineering 2013, European Space Agency

Tom, BEng Computer Science 2010, Twitter