various combinations



Date view Thread view Subject view Author view Attachment view

From: Joaquin Miller (miller@joaquin.net)
Date: Fri 14 Jun 2002 - 19:42:52 BST


i want to toss in three ideas:

1) Brian Henderson-Sellers has done   a   recent   comprehensive 
analysis.  [Examples: Jim Odell, Kilov&Ross, Bunge, Lesniewski, Medieval 
Philosophy.  (This is not to dispute any credit given to Brian, just to 
make sure the credit is spread around.) ]

2) There is plenty of room for various schemes.  [Examples: A piece of pie 
is not of the same kind as a pie. (i claim.)   This particular some of the 
water in the lake is of the same kind as all of the water in the lake, but 
not of the same kind as the lake.  (i claim.) (where 'i claim.' may, in 
both cases, be read: as i want to look at it.) ]

3) If two requirements can be met, we are home free:

a) An association (or, if you prefer, link) is a collection of model 
elements and an invariant that mentions each of those elements.

b) Our modelling language for expressing invariants is adequate.

.......

Which two kinds of means of expressing our love to our spouse make up the 
adequate set for practical use.  What are the definitions of these two 
kinds, exactly.  How do we know these definitions are correct?

Date view Thread view Subject view Author view Attachment view